An analysis of a man for all seasons by bolt

a man for all seasons summary act 2

More thinks that he can escape execution by keeping his trap shut, but Rich betrays him by falsely claiming in court that More said treasonous things. See, Henry had petitioned the Pope some time ago to marry his current wife, Catherine, but now he wants to petition him again to divorce her.

During the final courtroom scene, he provides false testimony, dooming the man he once revered.

A man for all seasons act 1 scene 7

Thomas More is shown dynamically defending his integrity with his whole heart and mind, as in an intricate game of chess with the King. At the time, divorce was not legal as it was controlled by the Roman Catholic Church. Despite these almost angelic characteristics, More explains to his daughter that he is no martyr, meaning that he does not wish to die for a cause. Law vs. Spain or rich vs. And that's it—More is beheaded in the final moments of the play. Why does Sir Thomas More voice his position now? The reader may believe that life is the greatest value to man, and to place anything above it would be asinine. Henry, on the other hand, insists on absolute power with no checks. He says if the bishops pass the act, he will resign his newly-acquired position. Throughout the drama, More is forthright, witty, contemplative, and honest. Unfortunately, Cromwell is still hunting him down.

He sees More as his ally in the matter. However, More must promise not to speak out against the divorce publicly. Some might argue that he is too honest.

Sir Thomas More lived the type of life that is foreign to many readers.

A man for all seasons summary

Score: 2. More replies that it amazes him too that no one else opposes the injustice going on. More would rouse his countrymen to defend the law that keeps them safe and gives them their freedom and basic rights. More is the ultimate ideal man, and Rich is the example of extreme immorality. They reconcile their differences and rekindle their love. Therefore, More chooses silence, hoping that by staying quiet he can maintain his honesty and avoid the executioner as well. If you are looking for an essay topic in response to A Man for All Seasons, consider this question: Is Sir Thomas More a static character or a dynamic character? Here, students may find evidence of a character arc. But for Wales! Even when locked away in the Tower of London , he politely interacts with his jailers and interrogators.

Even the Catholics—Chapuys, Roper, and More—differ in the way they see their religion. But that doesn't work at all. He says if the bishops pass the act, he will resign his newly-acquired position.

Chapuys has simplistically assumed that if More is against Cromwell he is for the Spanish.

a man for all seasons characters

More replies that it amazes him too that no one else opposes the injustice going on. His latest plan of attack is actually quite brilliant: he convinces Parliament to create an oath declaring Henry's spiritual supremacy.

A man for all seasons analysis essay

More is the ultimate ideal man, and Rich is the example of extreme immorality. Wolsey was not able to convince the Pope to give him special dispensation for the divorce. Does he hope to persuade others? With that honor comes an expectation. All the others, including good people, yield to pressure and let their edges be blurred by society or necessity. More refuses to sign it but won't say why, which leads to his imprisonment in the Tower—London's most feared prison. Score: 2. Her father could not morally be satisfied by this. Most main characters undergo a transformation. Rich eventually embraces his role as a scoundrel. Being friends with More could mean Norfolk would be considered a conspirator against the king.
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